St. Baldricks

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We are shaving our heads to raise money for childhood cancer research! Did you know that kids’ cancers are different from adult cancers? It’s true. And childhood cancer research is extremely underfunded. So we decided to do something about it by raising money for cures.

Now we need your help! Will you make a donation? Every dollar makes a difference for the thousands of infants, children, teens, and young adults fighting childhood cancers. Click the link below to donate today.

https://www.stbaldricks.org/teams/steesevfd

Check your winter emergency gear

With our recent snow storms, cold weather and ice fog, now is a good time to make sure you have your winter emergency gear in your vehicle. Below is a checklist to make sure you have the essentials you need for travel emergencies.

ALASKAN EMERGENCY CAR KIT

Car:  

Flares/warning lights
Small shovel
Booster/Jumper cables
Tire Chains
Kitty Litter (non-clumping) or Sand (for traction assistance)
Fuel line de-icer
Duct tape
Rope
Flashlight with extra batteries
Tow Rope

Personal:

First aid kit with pocket knife
Candles
Lighter/matches
Bottled water
Sleeping bag for each traveler
Food items: ex. fruits/nuts
Package of wipes
Toilet paper
Hand warming packets
Space blankets
Extra socks and mittens,hats

Check your Smoke Alarms, when you change the Clocks!

changeyouclock1
November 6th is daylight savings remember to change the batteries in your smoke alarms & CO monitors.
Most fatal fires occur at night. Every home needs working smoke alarms to provide an early warning. Install smoke alarms in all sleeping rooms, hallways that lead to sleeping areas, basements and each additional level of your home.
Smoke alarms should be mounted on the ceiling 4” from the wall; wall mounts should be 4-12” from the ceiling. Do not install near draft areas (windows,
vents.). Call your local fire department if you are unsure about placement.
A good time to remember to check your smoke alarm and change the batteries is when you change your clocks twice a year as daylight savings time begins and ends.
Prepare and practice an escape plan! Crawl low under smoke. Plan where to meet outside.
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Once you’re out,
Stay out!
Remember, almost every day a smoke alarm saves somebody’s life

FIRE STATION TRICK-OR-TREATING

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Halloween can be the most exciting time of the year for kids but also presents danger. The Steese Volunteer Fire Department wants this year’s trick-or-treating for your little goblins to be a safe one. Follow these safety tips for a happy and fire-safe Halloween:

Costumes

  • Choose the right costume. Try to stay away from long or flowing fabric.

Visibility

  • Provide flashlights to children or have children carry glow sticks as part of their costumes.
  • Make sure if a child is wearing a mask that the eye holes are large enough so he or she can see out of them.

Decorations

  • Avoid flammable decorations including dried flowers, cornstalks and crepe paper that are highly flammable.
  • Keep decorations away from open flames and other heat sources, including light bulbs and heaters.

 Candles

  • Refrain from having an open flame.
  • Use battery-operated candles or glow-sticks in your jack-o-lanterns.

Exits

  • Remember to keep all decorations away from doors so that they are not blocking any exits or escape routes.

Smoke Alarms

  • Make sure all of your smoke alarms are working and up to date.

The Steese Volunteer Fire Department is also offering its annual safe alternative for parents this Halloween. Both of our fire stations located at 585 Steele Creek Road & 800 William C. Leary Lane will be stocked with candy to hand out to kids who visit in their costumes, Halloween night. Unless an emergency run calls them away, doors will be open and firefighters will be handing out candy to kids from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Parents, please do not park on the drive in front of the emergency equipment.

 

2016 Fire Prevention Week

Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries.

Smoke alarms save lives. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. Having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half. Almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

Here’s what you need to know!
  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Test your smoke alarms every month.
  • When a smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside.
  • Replace all smoke alarms in your home every 10 years
    More about staying safe with smoke alarms.

2016 Burn Permits

The 2016 wild land fire season is upon us! Remember to visit the Alaska Division of Forestry website and fill out the online form to obtain a burn permit.

https://dnr.alaska.gov/burn?fuseaction=public.doShowBurnBarrelPage

Once you have your new burn permit, remember to call the number listed on the permit and listen to the Burn Advisory recording BEFORE you burn anything. It is your responsibility to make sure burning is allowed in your area prior to burning.

Burning in Alaska

  • The majority of wildland fires in Alaska are caused by careless human activity.
  • Alaska’s fire season is from April 1st to August 31st.
  • Burn permits are required during fire season for all open burning, with a few exceptions.
  • State laws and regulations pertaining to burning practices apply statewide all year. (AS 41.15.010-41.15-170 and 11 AAC95 Article 6).
  • Burn permits are subject to burn restrictions, suspensions, and closures.
  • All Burn Barrels require a burn permit and are subject to burn restrictions, suspensions and closures.
  • Campfires and warming fires less than 3 feet x 3 feet do not need a general burn permit. Remember burn safely, have tools and water, and put the fire out before you leave.
  • You are responsible for any fire you set or cause until it is ‘dead out’. Fully understand and follow safe burning practices.

 

If you see a wildland fire emergency, call 911 immediately